The reciprocal ministry of patients and caregiversEnjoying foodA real eye-opener Joyfully thankful

The reciprocal ministry of patients and caregivers

End-of-life issues are acute in most Western countries. What can the spirituality of unity contribute to this debate?

Enjoying food

A young registered dietitian offers a quick look at food as preventive medicine

A real eye-opener

For Chiara Lubich’s centennial (1920–2020), Living City is featuring a series of interviews with Focolare members in North America — this time with Dick and Shirley Tetreau from Toronto

Joyfully thankful

A mother navigates her fear as her son’s heart surgery unfolds

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Who cares?
When patients get lost in the business of healthcare

When people think of nurses, physicians and other healthcare practitioners, they associate them with healing, helping and willingness to serve others. For most who feel called to these professions, it is indeed a calling that requires long years of study and difficult exams. Yet once in the healthcare field, many become disillusioned as efficiency dictates the order of the day. They spend less time per patient, being occupied with administrative tasks, and the focus frequently shifts from the patient’s needs to the revenue that the service generates. More and more hospitals and private practitioners are forced to join larger corporations, which further distances the service provider from the people they intended to serve. We showcase some initiatives where healthcare professionals try to put the person back at the center.

Free articles

End-of-life issues are acute in most Western countries. What can the spirituality of unity contribute to this debate?

A young registered dietitian offers a quick look at food as preventive medicine

For Chiara Lubich’s centennial (1920–2020), Living City is featuring a series of interviews with Focolare members in North America — this time with Dick and Shirley Tetreau from Toronto

A mother navigates her fear as her son’s heart surgery unfolds